Italian Social Marketing Network – Newsletter 153

 


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ObjectivesGiven the degree of public mistrust and provider hesitation regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, it is important to explore how information regarding the vaccine is shared online via social media outlets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the content of messaging regarding the HPV vaccine on the social media and microblogging site Twitter, and describe the sentiment of those messages.Design and SampleThis study utilized a cross-sectional descriptive approach. Over a 2-week period, Twitter content was searched hourly using key terms “#HPV and #Gardasil,” which yielded 1,794 Twitter posts for analysis. Each post was then analyzed individually using an a priori coding strategy and directed content analysis.ResultsThe majority of Twitter posts were written by lay consumers and were sharing commentary about a media source. However, when actual URLs were shared, the most common form of share was linking back to a blog post written by lay users. The vast majority of content was presented as polarizing (either as a positive or negative tweet), with 51% of the Tweets representing a positive viewpoint.ConclusionsUsing Twitter to understand public sentiment offers a novel perspective to explore the context of health communication surrounding certain controversial issues.












Digital Health is a cultural transformation, not just a set of new technologies. Written by e-Patient Dave deBronkart and Dr. Bertalan Meskó. ………………………………………………………………..
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The root problem is that many digital health writers know plenty about apps but nothing about medicine. A secondary problem is a resulting sense that digital health is for idiots: imagine a trusting reader (you?) who goes to a doctor and mentions the article. The doctor concludes that e-health is stupid and the patient is naive….
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It is essential that health and care achieve their potential, which cannot be done based on false understandings. This is why I asked Dave to contribute with his revolutionary ideas and vision. Whenever I saw him speak, there was a standing ovation. If this article helps you see what Dave and I independently observed in our travels despite our completely different backgrounds, we will be grateful.



The use of social media (SM) in healthcare has provided a novel means of communication in line with a more modernised approach to care. For physicians, SM provides opportunities for enhancing professional development, networking, public health, and organisational promotion, among others. For patients, SM provides potential for taking a more active role in health, sharing information, and building virtual communities, especially in the case of chronic and/or rare diseases. SM has the potential to bring patients and physicians closer together, beyond the walls of clinics; however, the interaction between physicians and patients on SM has received mixed feelings, especially from the physicians’ perspective. On the one hand, the potential for a more enhanced, albeit remote, communication has been viewed positively, especially in an era where digital technologies are fast expanding. Conversely, concerns around breaches in professional boundaries and ethical conduct, such as mishandling of patient-sensitive information on these platforms, have fuelled heavy criticism around its use. From this viewpoint, issues arising from the use of SM in healthcare, with a focus on the patient–physician interaction, discussing the potential benefits and pitfalls are covered in this article.

































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Social Marketing – Newsletter 152

 


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Abstract
Governments across the WHO European Region need to take urgent action to address the growing public health, inequality, economic and environmental challenges in order to achieve sustainable development (meeting current needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs) and to ensure health and well-being for present and future generations. Based on a scoping review, this report concludes that current investment policies and practices (doing business as usual) are unsustainable, with high costs to individuals, families, communities, societies, the economy and the planet. Investment in public health policies that are based on values and evidence provides effective and efficient, inclusive and innovative solutions that can drive social, economic and environmental sustainability. Investing for health and well-being is a driver and an enabler of sustainable development, and vice versa, and it empowers people to achieve the highest attainable standard of health for all. here to edit the content



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Social Marketing – Newsletter 151

 


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Progetto in collaborazione con Last Minute Market (http://www.lastminutemarket.it/) che si occupa dell’iniziativa Farmaco Amico.
Siamo un gruppo di studenti dell’Università di Bologna.
Stiamo partecipando ad un progetto legato al corso di marketing sociale al fine di coinvolgere le persone in una campagna di sensibilizzazione per la raccolta e donazione di farmaci sul territorio bolognese.

Social Marketing – Newsletter 150

 


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Robert Darnton è Carl H. Pforzheimer Professor di Storia presso l’Università di Harvard, dove è anche Direttore della Biblioteca universitaria. Specialista dell’illuminismo francese, è uno dei massimi studiosi della storia del libro come fondamentale fattore di mutamento culturale. Più di recente si è occupato del rapporto tra digitalizzazione, accesso al sapere e democrazia. Tra i suoi libri in italiano: Il Grande Affare dei Lumi. Storia editoriale dell’Encyclopédie (Milano 1979); L’intellettuale clandestino. Il mondo dei libri nella Francia dell’illuminismo (Milano 1982); Il bacio di Lamourette (Milano 1989); La dentiera di Washington. Considerazioni critiche a proposito di illuminismo e modernità (Roma 1997); L’età dell’informazione. Una guida non convenzionale al Settecento (Milano 2004); Il futuro del libro (Milano 2011); Il grande massacro dei gatti e altri episodi della storia culturale francese (Milano 2013).






Social media has become prolific in everyday life and allows the instantaneous sharing of information, which can include health care information. The authors of a Research Note published on F1000Research suggests as medical vocabulary becomes more prevalent on social media that more comprehensible language should be used. In this guest blog, Farris Timimi, cardiologist, Medical Director of the Mayo Clinic Social Media Network and well-known health care Twitter user gives his view on this.Health care literacy continues to be a challenge. We all recognize the impact of literacy on quality outcomes, ranging from accessing health care, understanding the risk and benefits of tests and treatment to complying with medical advice. Health literacy can include a variety of things, including cultural, visual, computer and information comprehension; however, often not understanding the written information may be the most important and may have the greatest impact on health related outcomes.
Literacy and social media
The authors of this Research Note have demonstrated the potential application of social media, to serve as an aid to standard educational material.















La controverse estivale entre Elon Musk, le flamboyant patron de Tesla et Space X, et Marc Zuckerberg, le fondateur et CEO de Facebook, au sujet des dangers et opportunités de l’intelligence artificielle (IA) a quelque chose de bienvenu. Elle signale que les géants de la nouvelle économie ne forment pas un bloc monolithique dont la seule préoccupation serait de faire naître au forceps une nouvelle société digitale, sans qu’on s’arrête un instant sur le sens de cette révolution en cours.
Elle pose au fond une question politique : comment réguler ce qu’on ne comprend pas ? Parle-t-on, comme le Big Data, d’un outil au service de la prise de décision – publique, privée, commerciale… ? Ou bien faut-il voir dans l’IA un nouvel acteur qui décidera en lieu et place d’untel, ce qui implique de réfléchir à sa gouvernance ? Ces questions sont majeures car elles concernent la capacité des citoyens consommateurs à évaluer l’action publique et à faire des choix avertis, ou encore notre capacité collective à réguler les effets de l’intelligence artificielle. Devrons-nous tous être experts en code ou en algorithmique pour être des citoyens éclairés ?
En savoir plus sur
https://www.lesechos.fr/idees-debats/sciences-prospective/030518865674-intelligence-artificielle-ou-intelligence-collective-2111440.php#ZU1LmdZ5yAepwgBh.99



Understandably, some physicians are resistant to the idea of professionally embracing social media. I truly believe that everyone, can find a way to make these digital platforms work for them. With a unique voice, good content, patience and consistency, your practice’s social media accounts can become valuable assets. Here are a few ways it can pay off:
Build a Sense of Community
Interacting with patients to the degree we’d like and fostering great doctor-patient relationships that build loyalty simply isn’t possible all the time. A 2016 study that looked at doctors across 26 specialties found that patients spent an average of 13 to 16 minutes with their doctor, per visit. This is not a lot of time to address a patient’s immediate concerns, much less build a relationship. This is where social media comes in.



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